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Here is your weekly NEWS-Line for Women’s Health Care Providers eNewsletter.  For the latest news, jobs, education and blogs, posted daily, bookmark www.news-line.com/SW_home or to take NEWS-Line everywhere with you, save www.news-line.com/SW_home to your phone. Also, enjoy the latest issue of NEWS-Line magazine, always free.



NEWS:

Researchers Develop Early Detection Test For Ovarian Cancer

Researchers from Queen’s University Belfast have developed a test that may be able to detect ovarian cancer up to two years earlier than current approaches.

The researchers discovered that the presence of four proteins together, known as a biomarker panel, indicates the likelihood of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC), a type of ovarian cancer. Using these biomarkers the researchers then developed a screening test that initial studies suggest may be able to detect ovarian cancer up to two years before current detection tests.

The research was carried out in partnership with the University of New South Wales Australia, University of Milan, University of Manchester and University College London.

The study, published in British Journal of Cancer as part of Nature Group publication, involved the analysis of blood samples from 80 individuals across a seven-year period.

Dr Bobby Graham from t

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Moderate To Heavy Drinking During Pregnancy Alters Genes In Newborns, Mothers

Mothers who drink moderate to high levels of alcohol during pregnancy may be changing their babies’ DNA, according to a Rutgers-led study.

“Our findings may make it easier to test children for prenatal alcohol exposure – and enable early diagnosis and intervention that can help improve the children’s lives,” said lead author Dipak K. Sarkar, a Distinguished Professor and director of the Endocrine Program in the Department of Animal Sciences at Rutgers University–New Brunswick.

The study by Sarkar and scientists in a Collaborative Initiative on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders is in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.

Building on an earlier Rutgers-led study that found binge and heavy drinking may trigger long-lasting genetic change in adults, the researchers sought alcohol-induced DNA changes in 30 pregnant women and 359 children. They found changes to two gene

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Women And Elderly At Higher Risk Of Dangerous Drug Interactions

A new study led by researchers at Indiana University has found that women and older adults who use multiple prescription drugs are significantly more likely to be prescribed pills whose combination produces dangerous side effects.

The analysis, conducted in the Brazilian health care system and recently published in the journal npj Digital Medicine, revealed a 60% increased risk for adverse drug reaction in women compared to men -- and a 90% increased risk in cases of medicines whose interaction is known to produce dangerous reactions. In older people, one in every four people prescribed multiple medicines over age 55 received drugs with an interaction -- reaching one in every three for ages 70 to 79.

A total of 181 drug combinations prescribed against recommendations were uncovered. These medications, widely known to interact dangerously, were dispensed to 15,527 people among the study

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Home Births As Safe As Hospital Births: International Study

A large international study led by McMaster University shows that low risk pregnant women who intend to give birth at home have no increased chance of the baby's perinatal or neonatal death compared to other low risk women who intend to give birth in a hospital.

The results have been published by The Lancet's EClinicalMedicine journal.

"More women in well-resourced countries are choosing birth at home, but concerns have persisted about their safety," said Eileen Hutton, professor emeritus of obstetrics and gynecology at McMaster, founding director of the McMaster Midwifery Research Centre and first author of the paper. "This research clearly demonstrates the risk is no different when the birth is intended to be at home or in hospital."

The study examined the safety of place of birth by reporting on the risk of death at the time of birth or within the first four weeks, and found no cl

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