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NEWS:

Microwave Helmet Yields Fast And Safe Evaluation Of Head Injuries

Results from a clinical study demonstrates that microwave measurements can be used for a rapid detection of intracranial bleeding in traumatic brain injuries. A recently published scientific paper shows that health care professionals get vital information and can quickly decide on appropriate treatment if patients are examined using a microwave helmet.

The study demonstrates a new health care application for microwave measurements.

Previously, microwave measurements have been used to distinguish stroke caused by bleeding in the brain from stroke caused by cloth.

The new study shows that the technology also applies to patients affected by traumatic brain injury, which is the most common cause of death and disability among young people. This type of injuries are often caused by traffic accidents, assaults or falls. An estimated 10 million people are affected annually by traumatic brain

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Infant MRIs Show Autism Linked To Increased Cerebrospinal Fluid

A national research network led by UNC School of Medicine's Joseph Piven, MD, found that many toddlers diagnosed with autism at two years of age had a substantially greater amount of extra-axial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) at six and 12 months of age, before diagnosis is possible.

They also found that the more CSF at six months - as measured through MRIs - the more severe the autism symptoms were at two years of age.

"The CSF is easy to see on standard MRIs and points to a potential biomarker of autism before symptoms appear years later," says Piven, co-senior author of the study, the Thomas E. Castelloe Distinguished Professor of Psychiatry, and director of the Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities (CIDD). "We also think this finding provides a potential therapeutic target for a subset of people with autism."

The findings, published in Biological Psychiatry, point to faulty

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Telemedicine Ambulance May Deliver Faster Stroke Care

When experiencing a stroke, people who are brought to the hospital in an ambulance with a CT scanner and telemedicine capabilities are evaluated and treated nearly two times faster than people taken in a regular ambulance, according to a study published in the online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

An ischemic stroke is the most common kind of stroke, when a blood clot blocks blood flow to the brain. It can often be treated with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA), a clot-busting drug, but the drug ideally should be given within four-and-a-half hours of the start of symptoms to improve chances of recovery.

“The sooner someone is treated for stroke, the better chance they have for survival and an improved recovery,” said study author Muhammad S. Hussain, MD, of the Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland, Ohio, and member of the America

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Women More Likely To Follow Through With Breast Screening Recommendations When Informed Directly

A study published in the journal Health Communications shows that women at high risk for breast cancer who received a letter informing them of their options for additional imaging with contrast-enhanced MRI of the breast (in addition to a letter sent to their primary care physician) were more likely to return to the center for additional screening with MRI. The letter, which is included in the published paper, may help breast imaging centers navigate the complex legal, ethical and institutional landscapes in a way that increases the likelihood that women will follow through with American Cancer Society breast cancer screening recommendations for adjunct breast screening in women at elevated risk.

The project is a collaboration between Invision Sally Jobe Breast Centers, which contributed the de-identified data, and researchers from the University of Colorado Cancer Center, University of

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