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NEWS:

Infervision Launches First Artificial Intelligence Platform To Help Radiologists Diagnose Stroke Faster Using CT Brain Scans

Infervision, a tech company using deep learning and artificial intelligence to assist and improve medical image analysis, is introducing the first and only AI platform to help radiologists detect and diagnose stroke faster than ever, leading to patients getting lifesaving treatment when time is of the essence. This new stroke detection solution is being introduced at this week’s RSNA conference.

The new AI-CT Stroke Screening System is the first of the Infervision AI-CT (head) family. The new technology assists doctors to determine which type of stroke a patient may have suffered, either a hemorrhagic (bleeding) stroke or an ischemic (blood clot) stroke, so that patients can receive effective and faster treatment. With a stroke, a patient suffers loss of brain tissue as the tissue dies without proper blood flow, leading to various types of impairment or even death, so a speedier diagnos

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Ultrasound Imaging Needle To Transform Heart Surgery

Heart tissue can be imaged in real-time during keyhole procedures using a new optical ultrasound needle developed by researchers at UCL and Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

The revolutionary technology has been successfully used for minimally invasive heart surgery in pigs, giving an unprecedented, high-resolution view of soft tissues up to 2.5 cm in front of the instrument, inside the body.

Doctors currently rely on external ultrasound probes combined with pre-operative imaging scans to visualise soft tissue and organs during keyhole procedures as the miniature surgical instruments used do not support internal ultrasound imaging.

For the study, published today in Light: Science & Applications, the team of surgeons, engineers, physicists and material chemists designed and built the optical ultrasound technology to fit into existing single-use medical devices, such as a needle.

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3-D-Printed Prosthetic Implants Could Improve Treatment For Hearing Loss

Researchers using CT scans and 3-D printing have created accurate, custom-designed prosthetic replacements for damaged parts of the middle ear, according to a study being presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). The technique has the potential to improve a surgical procedure that often fails because of incorrectly sized prosthetic implants, researchers said.

Hearing works partly through the transmission of vibrations from the ear drum to the cochlea, the sensory organ of hearing, via three tiny bones in the middle ear known as ossicles. Ossicular conductive hearing loss occurs when the ossicles are damaged, such as from trauma or infection.

Conductive hearing loss can be treated through surgical reconstruction using prostheses made from stainless steel struts and ceramic cups. The surgery, which generally involves tailoring a prosthesis

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Study Suggests That Where Guidelines Disagree, Physicians’ Experiences With Their Patients, Family And Friends Shape Breast Cancer Screening Recommendations

Results of a national survey of more than 800 physicians suggest that their experiences with patients, family members and friends with breast cancer are linked with their recommendations for routine mammograms. Specifically, physicians who reported knowing at least one patient, family member or friend with a poor breast cancer prognosis and who had not been screened were more likely to recommend routine screening for their younger and older patients, age groups where routine screening is controversial.

A report of the findings, published in JAMA Internal Medicine,highlights the impact physicians’ social networks may have on their adherence to nationally recognized breast cancer screening guidelines.

“Our findings suggest that we need to help clinicians better understand the impact personal experiences with friends and family members, as well as their patients, have on their practices,”

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