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NEWS:

OCD Treatment Could Someday Start With A Brain Scan

Washing hands needlessly dozens of times of day. Spending so much time perfecting schoolwork that it never gets turned in.

These are typical behaviors for people with obsessive-compulsive disorder, or OCD, a lifelong illness marked by repetitive thoughts and actions that can seriously impair work performance, relationships and quality of life. OCD is most commonly treated with medication and a form of psychotherapy called cognitive behavioral therapy.

Unfortunately, cognitive behavioral therapy does not help everyone with OCD, and the treatment can be expensive and time-consuming.

Now, UCLA researchers have developed a way to use brain scans and machine learning — a form of artificial intelligence — to predict whether people with OCD will benefit from cognitive behavior therapy. The technique could help improve the overall success rate of cognitive behavioral therapy, and it could en

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Alternative MRI Contrast Agent Performs Well In NIH Study

NIH-supported researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) are studying an alternative to the contrast agents currently used for magnetic resonance imaging. In a recent study, they showed that the experimental alternative, a manganese-based compound, performs as well as approved contrast agents. Their study appeared online in Radiology.

Magnetic resonance (MR) images are taken so that a clinician can view various tissues inside the body. Often, they are taken without a contrast-enhancing agent, but four in ten MR procedures require injection of a contrast agent to view anatomical structures and indications of disease or injury.

All currently approved contrast agents contain the chemical element gadolinium, which is toxic in its free form. To make gadolinium safe for use in humans, it is tightly held by a binding agent, or chelator, to prevent the metal from depositing in the bod

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Pivotal Study Of Focused Ultrasound To Treat Parkinson's Disease

University of Maryland Medicine (the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC) and the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM)) is leading a phase 3 study to test the safety and efficacy of using MRI-guided focused ultrasound on the brain in order to treat Parkinson’s disease. The pivotal study is the final step before the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) will consider approving the new technology for widespread use as a nonsurgical treatment option to eliminate key motor symptoms of this common neurological condition.

“The goal of the focused ultrasound treatment is to both lessen the main symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, which include tremors, rigidity and slow movement, as well as treat the dyskinesia that is a medication side effect, so that less medication is needed,” says principal investigator Howard M. Eisenberg, MD, professor and chair of neurosurgery at UMS

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New Images Reveal How The Ear's Sensory Hairs Take Shape

Our ears are exquisite detection instruments, capable of discerning a whisper or distinct notes of music within a symphony. To pick up these sounds, tiny hair-like filaments in the inner ear must be packed into precisely arranged bundles, all facing the same direction. Images of the normal, tidy architecture of these bundles on cells within the cochlea, the inner ear structure responsible for hearing, were captured by researchers in A. James Hudspeth's lab at The Rockefeller University (top image).

This is part of an effort to understand how these hair bundles are constructed and aligned. Together with a collaborator at The Jackson Laboratory, they have recently identified a molecule that coordinates this process, a discovery that helps explain an important stage in the development of our sense of hearing.

Scientists already knew that a molecular blueprint guides the formation of upsi

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UPCOMING EVENTS:

Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting

11/25/2018 - 11/30/2018
Radiological Society of North America


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