X You are viewing the latest eNews for Speech-Language Pathologists & Audiologists, our weekly email newsletter sent to thousands of professionals and students.

[Return Home]
[Subscribe for Free]
[Become a Sponsor]



NEWS-Line - eNews

Here is your weekly NEWS-Line for Speech Language Pathologists & Audiology Professionals eNewsletter.  For the latest news, jobs, education and blogs, posted daily, bookmark www.news-line.com/PO_home or to take NEWS-Line everywhere with you, save www.news-line.com/PO_home to your phone. Also, enjoy the latest issue of NEWS-Line magazine, always free.



NEWS:

New Tech-Enabled Rehab Program Designed To Improve Recovery Experience for People Living With Dementia

Brookdale Senior Living is taking a new approach to providing skilled nursing and rehabilitation for people living with Alzheimer's and other dementias. A first of its kind in the nation to incorporate specific technology devices, this new dementia-friendly environment at Brookdale Overland Park features tech-enabled programs and trained clinicians focused on delivering person-centered, skilled nursing care and rehabilitation.

"This is a unique skilled care and rehabilitation program, offering so much more than just a secured, skilled dementia care environment," said Juliet Holt Klinger, Brookdale's dementia care expert. "Everything about this new space is designed to improve outcomes for people living with dementia. From our specially trained clinicians to state-of-the-art, evidence-based engagement technology we have in place, our focus is on improving function and promoting well-bein

Read Full Article

Post your openings here TODAY!!

Linguists Track Impact Of Cognitive Decline Across Three Decades Of One Writer's Diaries

Researchers at the University of Toronto (U of T) specializing in language variation and change have identified a specific relationship between an individual's use of language, and the transition from healthy to a diagnosis of severe dementia.

In a study of diary entries by Toronto resident Vivian White over a 31-year period, the researchers tracked the omission and then inclusion of the first-person pronoun "I" and found the transition occurred around the time she was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease.

The diaries span the period from 1985 to 2016, from age 60 to 90. Throughout the first 24 years, White omitted a subject up to 76% of the time (e.g. March 23, 1985: "Made cranberry muffins"). In contrast, following her diagnosis with Alzheimer's at age 84, she included the pronoun "I" 100% of the time (e.g. January 1, 2016: "I made cranberry muffins.")

"This suggests that individuals

Read Full Article

Finding Upends Theory About The Cerebellum’s Role In Reading And Dyslexia

New brain imaging research debunks a controversial theory about dyslexia that can impact how it is sometimes treated, Georgetown University Medical Center neuroscientists say.

The cerebellum, a brain structure traditionally considered to be involved in motor function, has been implicated in the reading disability known as developmental dyslexia. However, this “cerebellar deficit hypothesis” has always been controversial.

The new research shows that the cerebellum is not engaged during reading in typical readers and does not differ in children who have dyslexia. That finding comes from a new study involving children with and without dyslexia published October 9, 2019, in the journal Human Brain Mapping.

It is well established that dyslexia, a common learning disability, involves a weakness in understanding the mapping of sounds in spoken words to their written counterparts, a process

Read Full Article

New Genes Identified In Hearing Loss, Providing Treatment Hope

A new study published today in The American Journal of Human Genetics has identified 44 genes linked to age-related hearing loss giving a much clearer understanding of how the condition develops and potential treatments.

In the study, researchers from King's College London and UCL analysed the genetic data from over 250,000 participants of the UK Biobank aged 40-69 years to see which genes were associated with people who had reported having or not having hearing problems on questionnaire. 44 genes were identified to be linked with hearing loss.

By the age of 65, one third of people are affected by some degree of hearing loss which can lead to social isolation and disability and has been identified as a risk factor for dementia.

Despite being a common impairment in the elderly, little is known about the causes of the hearing loss and the only treatment option available is hearing aids

Read Full Article

More News


LINKS:




UPCOMING EVENTS:

ASHA Convention 2019

11/21/2019 - 11/23/2019
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association


Would you like to be Featured
in NEWS-Line for
Speech-Language Pathologists & Audiologists?

Click Here