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NEWS:

New Painkillers Reduce Overdose Risk

Scientists on the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have developed new opioid pain relievers that reduce pain on par with morphine but do not slow or stop breathing—the cause of opiate overdose.

The research, published in the journal Cell, describes a method for making safer opioid painkillers. According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 91 Americans die every day from opioid overdoses—deaths caused when opiates like oxycontin, heroin and fentanyl slow and eventually stop a person’s breathing.

Study leader TSRI Professor Laura M. Bohn, PhD, said the research shows that a range of compounds can deliver pain-blocking potency without affecting respiration.

The study builds on two decades of research by Bohn and her colleagues, who long questioned whether the painkilling pathway, called the G protein pathway, could be unlinked from the breathing s

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New Guidelines Issued For Diagnosis And Care Of LAM, A Rare Lung Disease

The American Thoracic Society (ATS) and the Japanese Respiratory Society (JRS) have published additional clinical practice guidelines regarding four specific questions related to the diagnosis of lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) and management of pneumothoraces in patients with LAM.

The latest guidelines supplement LAM guidelines that the two societies issued in 2016 for the diagnosis and management of the rare lung disease that primarily affects women of child-bearing age. The latest guidelines are published in the issue of the American Thoracic Society’s American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

LAM is a systemic disease that affects about five out of every million women. In patients with LAM, neoplastic smooth muscle-like cells arise from an unknown source, infiltrate the lung and result in cystic changes. Lung function declines at two to four times the normal rate,

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Breastfeeding Does Not Protect Children Against Asthma And Allergies

The effect of breastfeeding on the risk of developing asthma and allergy has been debated for a long time. In a recent study, Uppsala University researchers show that breastfeeding might in fact increase the risk of developing hay fever and eczema, while not having any clear effect on the risk of asthma. The results have been published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

Your risk of developing asthma and allergies depends on your genes, environment and lifestyle factors. Several lifestyle risk factors have already been well established in the scientific community, such as smoking. However, studies on breastfeeding have shown inconsistent results. Many studies have found breastfeeding to have a protective effect against asthma and allergy, while other studies have reported increased risk.

The current study looks at the effect of breastfeeding on asthma, hay fever and ecz

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Sleep Apnea May Increase Risk Of Developing Alzheimer’s Disease

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may put elderly people at greater risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease (AD), according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society’s American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

In “Obstructive Sleep Apnea Severity Affects Amyloid Burden in Cognitively Normal Elderly: A Longitudinal Study,” researchers report that biomarkers for amyloid beta (Ab), the plaque-building peptides associated with Alzheimer’s disease, increase over time in elderly adults with OSA in proportion to OSA severity. Thus, individuals with more apneas per hour had greater accumulation of brain amyloid over time.

According to the authors, AD is a neurodegenerative disorder that afflicts approximately five million older Americans. OSA is even more common, afflicting from 30 to 80 percent of the elderly, depending on how OSA is defined.

“Several stu

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