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NEWS:

Simulated Horseback Riding Helpful In Treating Children With Cerebral Palsy

Robotically assisted hippotherapy, a type of therapy that simulates the repetitive and rhythmic movement of a horse, has the potential to improve trunk control and quality of life for children with cerebral palsy, according to science presented this week at the Association of Academic Physiatrists Annual Meeting in Atlanta.

“For children with cerebral palsy, hippotherapy is one of the most effective types of therapy and can help improve balance, strength, endurance, and ultimately function and quality of life,” says Presenting author Justin Burton, MD; co-program director and pediatric rehabilitation medicine physician at the National Center for Children's Rehabilitation at MedStar National Rehabilitation Network. “Unfortunately, access is limited because there are relatively few sites, often with long wait lists, and it may not be covered by insurance. My colleague in pediatric rehabil

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Tissue Paper Sensors Show Promise For Health Care, Entertainment, Robotics

University of Washington engineers have turned tissue paper - similar to toilet tissue - into a new kind of wearable sensor that can detect a pulse, a blink of an eye and other human movement. The sensor is light, flexible and inexpensive, with potential applications in health care, entertainment and robotics.

The technology, described in a paper published in the journal Advanced Materials Technologies, shows that by tearing tissue paper that's loaded with nanocomposites and breaking the paper's fibers, the paper acts as a sensor. It can detect a heartbeat, finger force, finger movement, eyeball movement and more, said Jae-Hyun Chung, a UW associate professor of mechanical engineering and senior author of the research.

"The major innovation is a disposable wearable sensor made with cheap tissue paper," said Chung. "When we break the specimen, it will work as a sensor."

These small, Ba

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Video Games To Improve Mobility After A Stroke

The victims of cerebral infarcts that lose a part of the mobility of their body undergo physiotherapy treatments, while the therapies based on the training of attention are reserved for patients with cognitive disorders such as learning or memory difficulties.

Researchers at the Basque Center on Cognition, Brain and Language (BCBL) in San Sebastian and the London Imperial College have analyzed the architecture of brain injuries in stroke patients for more than three years. Their work proposes a new therapy for the mobility problems caused by ischemic strokes.

The study, published in the PNAS journal, has opened the door to a new therapeutic pathway that consists of complementing the physical treatments received by these patients with therapies to overcome attention deficit disorders, such as working with video games.

After accurately analyzing the patterns of brain injuries, the autho

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'Intellicane' Could One Day Help Flag Gait Problems, Falling Risks More Quickly

Feeling a little unsteady and don’t know why?

A pair of Vanderbilt University engineers have developed an instrumented cane that not only provides added support, but can also analyze your gait to determine your risk of falling. Nilanjan Sarkar, professor of mechanical and computer engineering, says the “IntelliCane” can quantitatively calculate falling risk as accurately as a physical therapist can with their own eyes. (Watch video)

If you are a senior citizen, dizziness and balance problems can be a big deal. In the United States, every year one out of three adults over 65 years of age falls and the statistic climbs to one out of two after age 80. Falls can be serious, leading to hip and other bone fractures, brain injury, loss of independence and even death. Falls are also expensive: The cost of treating injuries from falls is estimated at $34 billion annually.

The problem is not re

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UPCOMING EVENTS:

04/19/2018 - 04/22/2018
American Occupational Therapy Association


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