X You are viewing the latest eNews for Pharmacists, our weekly email newsletter sent to thousands of professionals and students.

[Return Home]
[Subscribe for Free]
[Become a Sponsor]



NEWS-Line - eNews

FEATURED SPONSOR:

Olympic Medical Center
Pharmacist

Port Angeles Washington

Job Board
Find a Job Near You

Nationwide


SPONSORS:

Jobs RSS Feed

Here is your weekly NEWS-Line for Pharmacists eNewsletter.  For the latest news, jobs, education and blogs, posted daily, bookmark www.news-line.com/PH_home or to take NEWS-Line everywhere with you, save www.news-line.com/PH_home to your phone. Also, enjoy the latest issue of NEWS-Line magazine, always free.



NEWS:

Asthma Pill Targets Airway Muscles To Decrease Attacks

Results from a phase II clinical trial, experimental work on cells and computational modelling have together shown why the first pill for asthma in 20 years can help reduce asthma attacks.

Researchers from Leicester (UK) and Vancouver (Canada) have shown that the investigational drug, Fevipiprant (an oral, selective prostaglandin D2 receptor antagonist), reduces the amount of smooth muscle in the airway lining. The findings are published in Science Translational Medicine.

Professor Chris Brightling, a consultant respiratory physician at Leicester's Hospitals and professor of respiratory medicine at the University of Leicester, said: "Our research shows for the first time that Fevipiprant not only reduces inflammation in the airways, but also reduces the amount of muscle in the lining of the airway. This is likely to explain some of the effects seen in the symptoms and breathing tests f

Read Full Article

Post your openings here TODAY!!

Even As Hospitals Cut Risky Antibiotic Use In-House, Patients Often Go Home with Them

Even as hospitals try to cut back on prescribing powerful but risky antibiotics for their patients, a new study shows that many of those patients still head home with prescriptions for those same drugs -- increasing their risk of everything from “superbug” infections to torn tendons.

In fact, the hospitals that said they are actively trying to reduce use of a group of antibiotics known as fluoroquinolones were twice as likely to discharge patients with a new prescription for one of the drugs in that risky group.

In all, one-third of the patients studied received a fluoroquinolone prescription at the end of their hospital stay, despite the fact that current guidelines call for restricted use due to side effects.

And across all 48 Michigan hospitals in the study, discharge-related prescriptions accounted for two-thirds of the entire fluoroquinolone supply prescribed to the nearly 12,000

Read Full Article

University Of Minnesota Researchers 3D Bio-Print A Model That Could Improve Anticancer Drugs And Treatments

University of Minnesota medical researchers and engineers have developed a way to study cancer cells which could lead to new and improved treatment. They have developed a new way to study these cells in a 3D in vitro model (i.e. in a culture dish rather than in a human or animal).

In a paper recently published in Advanced Materials, Angela Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Ph.D., vice chair for research and professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Minnesota Medical School, director of the 3D Bioprinting Facility, and member of the Masonic Cancer Center, and her fellow researchers found that cells behave differently in this 3D soft tissue environment than on 2D plastic or glass surfaces, for example.

“This model is more consistent with what the body is like,” said Panoskaltsis-Mortari, “and, therefore, studying the effects of drugs with human cells at this level makes the resu

Read Full Article

Customized Drug Interaction Alerts Address Alert Fatigue, Protect Patients

For anyone who regularly uses a computer, the experience of clicking through multipage user agreements is a shared frustration. Being bombarded with too much information can lead to people ignoring vital material.

Clinicians who use electronic health records can experience similar problems with drug interaction alerts. Now, investigators at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital have developed a method for customizing and reducing these alerts. The study, which appears as an advance online publication today in the journal Pediatrics, enhances the user experience with electronic health records while improving patient safety.

One of the benefits of electronic health records is that the systems are configured to alert clinicians when medications are prescribed that may not work well together.

However, the systems are only beneficial when alerts identify relevant problems and when caregiv

Read Full Article

More News


LINKS:


UPCOMING EVENTS:

ASHP Midyear Clinical Meeting

12/08/2019 - 12/12/2019
American Society of Health-System Pharmacists


Would you like to be Featured
in NEWS-Line for
Pharmacists?

Click Here