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Here is your weekly NEWS-Line for Pharmacists eNewsletter.  For the latest news, jobs, education and blogs, posted daily, bookmark www.news-line.com/PH_home or to take NEWS-Line everywhere with you, save www.news-line.com/PH_home to your phone. Also, enjoy the latest issue of NEWS-Line magazine, always free.



NEWS:

Pharmacists Provide Patient Value In Team-Based Care

With inhaler in hand, Dr. Cheng Yuet went over every detail to make sure the patient understood how the drug would control their COPD symptoms.

"Use it every day, whether you feel like you need it or not," she urged.

Dr. Yuet is proving what a difference it makes when pharmacists are integrated into the health care team. As part of an innovative model being used at UNT Health Science Center, Dr. Yuet and three other pharmacists manage the care of patients with chronic diseases such as asthma, diabetes and hypertension.

"Our scope is pretty broad, which is unique in pharmacy," Dr. Yuet said. "As part of the health care team, our pharmacists can prescribe, change and refill medications; order laboratory tests; and schedule in-person or telephone visits for chronic disease state management."

Many patients are unfamiliar with seeing a pharmacist in this role, Dr. Yuet said.

"It is impor

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Vaccine Against RSV Could Be In Sight, Researchers Say

A vaccine for the common and sometimes deadly RSV (respiratory syncytial virus) has been elusive, but scientists say a new discovery puts them much closer to success.

A new study from The Ohio State University provides a potential blueprint for finding the immunological sweet spot – a vaccine weak enough that it doesn’t make people sick but strong enough that it prompts an ample immune response, ensuring that the body will recognize RSV as an intruder in the future, and quickly mount a protective defense.

In a study published today (Oct. 9, 2019) in the journal Nature Communications, researchers report success in knocking out an epigenetic modification known as N6-methyladenosine in RSV RNA – a technique that proved to tamp down the virus and prompt a robust immune response in cotton rats.

“We now have a novel target to go after, and are working with industry toward a vaccine,” said t

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β-blockers Build Heart Muscle, May Help Infants With Congenital Heart Disease

Surgery can mend congenital heart defects shortly after birth, but those babies will carry a higher risk of heart failure throughout the rest of their lives. Yet, according to a Science Translational Medicine study published today by UPMC Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh researchers, β-blockers could supplement surgery to regenerate infant heart muscle and mitigate the lasting effects of congenital heart disease.

“The question is no longer ‘can we save this baby?’” said senior author Bernhard Kühn, M.D., associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Pittsburgh and director of the Pediatric Institute for Heart Regeneration and Therapeutics at UPMC Children’s Hospital. “The challenge for our young patients is that we want to enable them to have a long lifespan, ideally as long as a person without heart disease.”

For a relatively common congenital heart defect called Tetralogy

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The Threat Of Multidrug Resistance: One Step Toward Unraveling The Rise Of Superbacteria

Multidrug-resistant bacteria limit the effectiveness of antibiotics, and to stop these "superbacteria," we need to understand how their resistance works. Thanks to the concerted efforts of scientists worldwide, we already know something about the cellular pathways underlying multidrug resistance in microorganisms, including a few of the molecules involved. RNAs, encoded by DNA (genes), act as both precursors to the final proteins (called mRNAs) or as regulators of expression of such mRNAs. For example, small noncoding RNAs, molecules expressed in response to cellular stress, control the expression of many mRNAs that influence how bacteria respond to antibiotics through the proteins they encode.

In a study published in Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, a research team led by Prof Kwang-sun Kim at Pusan National University identified genes and associated pathways respon

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UPCOMING EVENTS:

ASHP Midyear Clinical Meeting

12/08/2019 - 12/12/2019
American Society of Health-System Pharmacists


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