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Study Shows How Memory Function Could be Preserved After Brain Injury | NEWS-Line for Acute and Ambulatory Care Professionals
 


Study Shows How Memory Function Could be Preserved After Brain Injury


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A study examining the effect of the immune receptor known as Toll-like Receptor 4, or TLR4, on how memory functions in both the normal and injured brain has found vastly different cellular pathways contribute to the receptor’s effects on excitability in the uninjured and injured brain.

The study, led by Viji Santhakumar of the University of California, Riverside, and performed on rats, has the potential to lead to treatments aimed at limiting memory deficits after brain injury.

The brain has neurons and non-neuronal cells called glia. In the normal brain, the activity of neurons is suppressed by TLR4; in the injured brain, TLR4 increases neuronal activity. The UC Riverside-led study found only neurons are involved in TLR4-mediated increase in excitability in the injured brain. In contrast, glial cells are necessary for TLR4-mediated reduction of excitability in the normal brain.

“Memory deficits are a major long-term adverse consequence of brain injury and the ability of a drug treatment given a day after injury to improve memory function is of significant clinical interest,” said Santhakumar, an associate professor of molecular, cell and systems biology. “Resatorvid, a drug approved for clinical trials in other diseases, effectively blocked TLR4 and improved post-injury memory deficits in our study.”

For more information, please visit: https://news.ucr.edu/articles/2020/05/12/study-shows-how-memory-function-could-be-preserved-after-brain-injury







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