Login / Register

Username:


Password: [Lost?]



New User? Click here for your FREE subscription



Healthcare Professionals
Healthcare Professionals Healthcare Professionals

Follow Us


NEWS-Line on Twitter NEWS-Line on Facebook NEWS-Line on Google+ NEWS-Line on LinkedIn NEWS-Line on Pinterest


Healthcare Conferences &
Educational Opportunities




May 9 - 11

FSRC Sunshine Seminar 2019

Florida Society for Respiratory Care

May 18 - 22

AAPA 2019 Conference

American Academy of PAs

June 1 - 02

The Excellence Conference 2019 Austin

Excellence in Advanced Practice

June 2 - 05

2019 NADONA 32ND ANNUAL CONFERENCE

NADONA

June 11 - 14

Skin, Bones, Hearts & Private Parts 2019 Destin CME/CE Conference

Skin, Bones, Hearts & Private Parts

More Events

Signs Of Memory Problems Could Be Symptoms Of Hearing Loss Instead | NEWS-Line for Speech-Language Pathologists & Audiologists

Signs Of Memory Problems Could Be Symptoms Of Hearing Loss Instead


Source:

Older adults concerned about displaying early symptoms of Alzheimer's disease should also consider a hearing check-up, suggest recent findings.

What might appear to be signs of memory loss could actually point to hearing issues, says Dr. Susan Vandermorris, one of the study's authors and a clinical neuropsychologist at Baycrest.

A recent Baycrest study, published in the Canadian Journal on Aging, found that the majority (56 per cent) of participants being evaluated for memory and thinking concerns and potential brain disorders had some form of mild to severe hearing loss, but only about 20 per cent of individuals used hearing aids. Among the participants, a quarter of them did not show any signs of memory loss due to a brain disorder.

"We commonly see clients who are worried about Alzheimer's disease because their partner complains that they don't seem to pay attention, they don't seem to listen or they don't remember what is said to them," says Dr. Vandermorris. "Sometimes addressing hearing loss may mitigate or fix what looks like a memory issue. An individual isn't going to remember something said to them if they didn't hear it properly."

Hearing loss is the third most common chronic health condition in older adults, which is experienced by 50% of individuals over the age of 65 and 90% of people over the age of 80. It takes an average of 10 years before people seek treatment and less than 25% of individuals who need hearing aids will buy them.

Hearing status is not always addressed in neuropsychology clinics, but can impact performance on memory assessments done verbally, adds Dr. Vandermorris.

"Some people may be reluctant to address hearing loss, but they need to be aware that hearing health is brain health and help is available," she adds.

The study analyzed results from 20 individuals who were receiving a neuropsychological assessment at Baycrest. Participants completed a hearing screening test after their cognitive evaluation.

Neuropsychologists were privy to hearing test results after their initial assessment, which altered some of their recommendations. For example, some clients were referred to a hearing clinic for a full audiology assessment or to consider using a hearing aid, as well as provided education on hearing loss and communication.

"Since hearing loss has been identified as a leading, potentially modifiable risk factor for dementia, treating it may be one way people can reduce the risk," says Marilyn Reed, another author on the study and practice advisor with Baycrest's audiology department. "People who can't hear well have difficulty communicating and tend to withdraw from social activities as a way of coping. This can lead to isolation and loneliness, which can impact cognitive, physical and mental health."

This study builds on earlier research that analyzed how addressing memory problems could benefit older adults seeking hearing loss treatment.

"We are starting to learn more about the important role hearing plays in the brain health of our aging population," says Dr. Kate Dupuis, lead author on the study, a former postdoctoral fellow at Baycrest, clinical neuropsychologist and Schlegel Innovation Leader at the Sheridan Centre for Elder Research. "In order to provide the best care to our older clients, it is imperative that neuropsychologists and hearing care professionals work together to address the common occurrence of both cognitive and hearing loss in individuals."

Since the studies, Baycrest's Neuropsychology and Cognitive Health Program and Hearing Services have incorporated general screening for hearing and memory issues into their assessments, as well as provided educational materials to clients.

Next steps for the study will involve optimizing screening strategies for hearing loss in memory assessments and ongoing interprofessional collaborations to create educational tools that counsel clients about the relationship between hearing, memory and brain health.

Source:BAYCREST CENTRE FOR GERIATRIC CARE

Photo Credit:BAYCREST


Post not cached because it doesn't exist


Share This!


Healthcare Jobs






Nursing Instructor

Piedmont Technical College
National

Nursing Instructor

Piedmont Technical College
Faculty

Nursing Instructor

Piedmont Technical College
South Carolina

SPEECH/LANGUAGE PATHOLOGISTS

Shield Institute
Bronx, New York

Full Time and Per Diem Registered Nurses

SecureMD
California

SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGIST - AAC OPPORTUNITY in an Article 16 Clinic

Shield Institute
Flushing, New York

More Jobs
(Dismiss) Thank you for visiting NEWS-Line! Please sign up, login, or follow us on your favorite social networks
to receive custom tailored eNews, job listings, and educational opportunities for your specific profession.