Physical Therapists & PT Assistants Physical Therapists & PT Assistants
    Magazines     eNews      Latest News     Job Board     Conferences & Education     Featured Q&As     Post Your Resume     Break Room
New subscriber?
Free Subscription

SIGN IN
Username:
Password: [Lost?]

Login to manage your
subscriptions & profile




Physical Therapist Conferences, Events, and Education

Physical Therapist Conferences &
Educational Opportunities

38th Annual UC Davis Fingers to the Toes: A Comprehensive Review of Primary Care Orthopaedics
09/19/2014 - 09/24/2014
UC Davis Health System, Office of CME, and Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

Healthcare Ergonomics
09/27/2014 - 09/27/2014
The Back School

Healthcare Ergonomics
10/18/2014 - 10/18/2014
The Back School

2014 CPTA Annual Conference
10/24/2014 - 10/25/2014
California Physical Therapy Association

The Philadelphia Meeting – Surgery and Rehabilitation of the Hand: with Emphasis on Trauma
03/07/2015 - 03/07/2015
Hand Rehabilitation Foundation, Jefferson Health System & Moss Rehab

More Events



Related Terms:
orthopedic , orthopaedic , rehabilitation , physical therapy
Early fevers associated with lower allergy risk later in childhood | NEWS-Line for Nurses
06/12/2004
NEWSRoom | Source:  

Early fevers associated with lower allergy risk later in childhood



Infants who experience fevers before their first birthday are less likely to develop allergies by ages six or seven, according to a new study funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, lends support to the well-known "hygiene hypothesis," which contends that early exposure to infections might protect children against allergic diseases in later years.

"The prevalence of asthma and allergies has increased dramatically worldwide in recent years," says Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., director of NIAID. "This study provides evidence that diminished exposure to early immunological challenges could be one of the reasons for this trend."

"The hygiene hypothesis is widely recognized but largely unproven," says Kenneth Adams, Ph.D., who oversees asthma research funded by NIAID. "The findings of this study strengthen the hypothesis and, after more research, could lead to preventative therapies for asthma and allergies."

The authors of the study followed the medical records of 835 children from birth to age 1, documenting any fever-related episodes. Fever was defined as a rectal temperature of 101 degrees Fahrenheit or above. At age 6 to 7 years, more than half of the children were evaluated for their sensitivity to common allergens, such as dust mites, ragweed and cats.

Researchers found that, of the children who did not experience a fever during their first year, 50.0 percent showed allergic sensitivity. Of those who had one fever, 46.7 percent became allergy-prone. The children who suffered two or more fevers in their infancy had greater protection, with only 31.3 percent showing allergic sensitivity by ages 6 to 7.

In particular, fever-inducing infections involving the eyes, ears, nose or throat appeared to be associated with a lower risk of developing allergies, compared with similar infections that did not result in fevers.

"We didn't expect fever to relate with such a consistent effect," says Christine C. Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., senior research epidemiologist of the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit, MI, and one of the co-authors of the study. "It also was interesting that the more fevers an infant had, the less likely it was that he or she would be sensitive to allergies."

Dr. Johnson says that more research is needed to establish if early fevers have a direct effect on allergic development in children. Additionally, she and the other authors are working to determine if early exposure to pets as well as high levels of bacteria could also lower allergy risk. "If we can uncover which environmental factors affect allergic development and why, it may be possible to immunize children against these conditions," she says.

This study also received support from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, another NIH component.





Share This!






Short Link: http://www.news-line.com/?s150716
Copy




comments powered by Disqus


Healthcare Jobs

Healthcare Jobs

Ovulation Induction Clinical Coordinator
Reproductive Health Specialists
Pittsburgh, PA

Home Health Nurse
Floyd Valley Hospital/Avera Health
Iowa

RNs
Best PCS Home Care
West Palm Beach, Jupiter, Stuart, Port St Lucie and Vero Beach, Florida

Speech & Language Pathologist
Autism Spectrum Therapies
California

Associate Degree Nursing Instructor Emergency Medical Services Instructor Vocational Nursing Instructor
Laredo Community College
National

Associate Degree Nursing Instructor Emergency Medical Services Instructor Vocational Nursing Instructor
Laredo Community College
Faculty

More Jobs
(Dismiss) Thank you for visiting NEWS-Line! Please sign up, login, or follow us on your favorite social networks
to receive custom tailored eNews, job listings, and educational opportunities for your specific profession.

HOME | GENERAL INFORMATION | READER SERVICES | ADVERTISER SERVICES | RSS DIRECTORY | CONTACT US
Copyright ©2014 NEWS-Line Publishing