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Many Older People Have Mutations Linked To Leukemia, Lymphoma In Their Blood Cells

At least 2% of people over age 40 and 5% of people over 70 have mutations linked to leukemia and lymphoma in their blood cells, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Mutations in the body’s cells randomly accumulate as part of the aging process, and most are harmless. For some people, genetic changes in blood cells can develop in genes that play roles in initiating leukemia and lymphoma even though such people don’t have the blood cancers, the scientists report in Nature Medicine.

The findings, based on blood samples from nearly 3,000 patients, don’t mean that people with these genetic mutations are destined to develop a blood cancer. In fact, the vast majority of them won’t as the incidence of blood cancers such as leukemia or lymphoma is less than 0.1% among the elderly.

Males With IBS Report More Social Stress Than Females

One of the few studies to examine gender differences among patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has found that males with the condition experience more interpersonal difficulties than do females with the condition.

The findings challenge what had been predicted by the University at Buffalo investigator and his colleagues.

The study, “Understanding gender differences in IBS: the role of stress from the social environment,” is being presented during the poster session at the American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) annual meeting in Philadelphia.

After Heart Ailments, Urological Issues Are The Most Common Conditions For Newborns, And Those Ailments Affect Girls More Than Boys

Children’s Hospital Los Angeles physician-scientist Roger E. De Filippo, MD, an associate professor of urology and director of Pediatric Urology Stem Cell Research at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California discusses how science, technology and parental care can lead to improved pediatric urological health.

Improving Bladder Function Among People With Spinal Cord Injuries

People who have suffered spinal cord injuries are often susceptible to bladder infections, and those infections can cause kidney damage and even death.

New UCLA research may go a long way toward solving the problem. A team of scientists studied 10 paralyzed rats that were trained daily for six weeks with epidural stimulation of the spinal cord and five rats that were untrained and did not receive the stimulation. They found that training and epidural stimulation enabled the rats to empty their bladders more fully and in a timelier manner.

The study was published in the online journal PLOS ONE.

Study Questions 21-day Quarantine Period For Ebola

As medical personnel and public health officials are responding to the first reported cases of Ebola Virus in the United States, many of the safety and treatment procedures for treating the virus and preventing its spread are being reexamined. 

One of the tenets for minimizing the risk of spreading the disease has been a 21-day quarantine period for individuals who might have been exposed to the virus. But a new study by Charles Haas, PhD, a professor in Drexel’s College of Engineering, suggests that 21 days might not be enough to completely prevent spread of the virus.

Haas’s study “On the Quarantine Period for Ebola Virus,” recently published in PLOS Currents: Outbreaks looks at the murky basis for our knowledge about the virus, namely previous outbreaks in Africa in 1976 (Zaire) and 2000 (Uganda) as well as the first 9 months of the current outbreak.

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