TwitterFacebookGoogle+LinkedInPinterest

Featured Posts



New Smartphone App Can Detect Newborn Jaundice In Minutes

Newborn jaundice: It’s one of the last things a parent wants to deal with, but it’s unfortunately a common condition in babies less than a week old.

UW-logoSkin that turns yellow can be a sure sign that a newborn is jaundiced and isn’t adequately eliminating the chemical bilirubin. But that discoloration is sometimes hard to see, and severe jaundice left untreated can harm a baby.

University of Washington engineers and physicians have developed a smartphone application that checks for jaundice in newborns and can deliver results to parents and pediatricians within minutes. It could serve as a screening tool to determine whether a baby needs a blood test — the gold standard for detecting high levels of bilirubin.

Brain Networks ‘Hyper-Connected’ In Young Adults Who Had Depression

Depression may be better predicted and understood now that University of Illinois at Chicago researchers have discovered that young adults who previously experienced the mental illness have hyper-connected emotional and cognitive networks in the brain.

uic-logoUIC researchers used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine the brain connectivity of young adults ages 18 to 23 while they were in a resting state. Thirty unmedicated young adults who had previously experienced depression and 23 healthy controls were used in the study, which has been published online in the journal PLOS ONE.

“We wanted to see if the individuals who have had depression during their adolescence were different from their healthy peers,” said Rachel Jacobs, research assistant professor in psychiatry at UIC’s Institute for Juvenile Research, the lead author of the study.

Center For Minimally Invasive Surgery At Rutgers Cancer Institute Of New Jersey Offers Array Of Services

Minimally invasive surgical procedures have become more common over the past decade, and when offered through a comprehensive program that has a specialized focus in this type of surgery “it is of great benefit to the patient,” says Mira Hellmann, MD, director of the new Center for Minimally Invasive Surgery at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey.

The Center for Minimally Invasive Surgery features more than 20 surgeons, who are specially trained in robotic and laparoscopic methods through a rigorous program in conjunction with Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, the flagship hospital of the Cancer Institute of New Jersey.

As Ebola Rages, Controlling The Deadly Spread

The outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus in West Africa has Americans concerned about their health and safety. The World Health Organization (WHO) has declared an international public health emergency in an effort both to contain the spread of the virus, which is considered 90% fatal, and to warn people about its seriousness.

A WHO official has said it is likely that the worst of the outbreak is yet to come.

At major entry points to the United States, including Newark Liberty and Kennedy International Airports, government workers are on alert in case incoming travelers who have been to West Africa show signs of illness and need to be quarantined. Federal, state and local health officials, as well as hospitals, have established detailed protocols for handling possible cases, taking advantage of a sophisticated public health infrastructure that poorer countries lack.

Device Implanted For Tricuspid Valve Replacement: First In United States

The University of Michigan Frankel Cardiovascular Center is the first heart center in the nation to perform percutaneous implantation of the Edwards SAPIEN valve to replace a patient’s tricuspid valve.

Percutaneous interventions use hollow tubes called catheters to reach chambers of the heart rather than opening a patient’s chest, and are increasingly used to fix heart valves.

Cardiac surgeon Steven Bolling, MD, interventional cardiologist Stanley Chetcuti, MD; interventional cardiologist Daniel Menees, MD, and cardiac surgeon Matthew Romano, MD, successfully completed the procedure Aug. 11.

%d bloggers like this: