Check out the new NEWS-Line! For the latest healthcare news, jobs, and events, please visit our main page,

Use your mobile device to relish Ladbrookes casino games wherever and whenever you are.

Featured Posts

Making The Heart Beat With Ultrasonic Waves

Ultrasound—the technology used for sonograms and examining the heart—can increase the rate at which heart cells beat, researchers from Drexel University report. In their paper “Ultrasound-Induced Modulation of Cardiac Rhythm in Neonatal Rat Ventricular Cardiomyocytes,” published ahead-of-print in the Journal of Applied Physiology, they describe the ultrasound settings that can change the beat frequency of cardiac cells.

The heart beating irregularly or stopping altogether is a life-threatening condition that must be treated immediately to avoid serious organ damage or death. Current ways of restoring and maintaining heart rate are invasive, involving electrodes threaded through the veins or placed surgically. Ultrasound is an attractive alternative because it can be applied non-invasively and would avoid the complications associated with surgery. Previous studies have shown that ultrasound at a high enough intensity can cause premature contractions and may be able to synchronize beating heart cells, suggesting the feasibility of an ultrasound pacemaking device.

Most Women Don’t Know Female-Specific Stroke Signs

A national survey released today by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center shows that most women don’t know the risks or symptoms females face when it comes to having a stroke.

The survey of 1,000 women released in time for Stroke Awareness Month in May found that only 11% of women could correctly identify pregnancy, lupus, migraine headaches and oral contraception or hormone replacement therapy as female-specific stroke risks.

The survey also found that only 10% were aware that hiccups combined with atypical chest pain are among the early warning signs of a stroke in women when accompanied by or followed by typical stroke symptoms. Stroke is the third leading cause of death for women, according to the National Stroke Association.

Round-The-Clock Glucose Control For Pregnant Diabetic Women

Achieving better glucose control in pregnant women with diabetes by using continuous glucose monitoring may help them give birth to healthier children, new research from the University of Leeds says.

Up to 50% of babies born to women with diabetes are born too large, which can lead to greater intervention and problems during childbirth and also increase the risk of the child developing diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular disease later in life.

Usually, pregnant women with diabetes monitor their glucose during the day using the traditional ‘finger-prick’ test, which can be painful and inconvenient. However, only snapshots of what is happening to the glucose are picked up, as it is only done between four and eight times a day, and not at all during the night when asleep.

Inclusive Classrooms Don’t Necessarily Increase Friendships For Children With Disabilities

Dropping off a child at kindergarten for the first time can be one of the most memorable yet terrifying experiences of parenthood. Among the many concerns parents face is the worry whether your child will make friends — a key factor, research shows, in reducing anxiety, depression and the likelihood of being bullied.

For parents of children with disabilities, the concern is even greater as four-out-of-10 of their children will enter kindergarten without the social skills necessary to develop close friendships. The response from schools has been to create inclusive classrooms, where a significant number of students with disabilities now receive the majority of their education and are believed to have a better chance at developing close relationships with peers.

Are Hospitals Doing All They Can To Prevent C. Diff Infections? Not Yet, New Study Suggests

Nearly half of American hospitals aren’t taking key steps to prevent a kind of gut infection that kills nearly 30,000 people annually and sickens hundreds of thousands more – despite strong evidence that such steps work, according to a new study.

While nearly all of the 398 hospitals in the study use a variety of measures to protect their patients from Clostridium difficile infections, 48% haven’t adopted strict limits on the use of antibiotics and other drugs that can allow the dangerous bug to flourish, the researchers report.

Hospital patients are especially prone to developing C. diff infections, and suffering serious effects — especially after they take antibiotics that disrupt the community of bacteria in their digestive systems.

%d bloggers like this: